Gonorrhea/Chlamydia

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The gonorrhea/chlamydia test is to screen for or diagnose a gonorrhea and/or chlamydia infection. Testing for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonorrhea) is generally done simultaneously as the two organisms have similar clinical presentations. A definitive diagnosis is important since the symptoms of chlamydia can resemble those of gonorrhea and the two infections require different antibiotic treatment.

Gonorrhea Testing

The test is looking for presence of the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which causes the sexually transmitted disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that more than 700,000 people in the U.S. get new gonorrheal infections each year, but only half of these infections are reported to the CDC. Gonorrhea is generally transmitted through sexual contact (oral, vaginal, or anal) with an infected partner.

What are the symptoms of gonorrhea?

Many infected people do not exhibit symptoms of gonorrhea, so routine screening is recommended for sexually active individuals. If symptoms do exist, they may present as one or more of the following:

  • Pain during urination
  • Pain during bowel movements
  • Anal discharge
  • Itching
  • Soreness
  • Bleeding
  • A newborn with conjunctivitis

Women may also experience

  • Increased vaginal discharge
  • Vaginal bleeding between periods

Men may also experience

  • Penile discharge
  • Painful, swollen testicles

Is gonorrhea curable?

Gonorrhea can be cured when treated with a course of antibiotics.

What happens if I don't get treatment?

Untreated gonorrhea can lead to the following in women:
  • Chronic menstrual difficulties
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
  • Miscarriage
  • Inflammation of the bladder
  • Inflammation of the lining of the uterus after childbirth
If left untreated in men, it can lead to:
  • Inflammation of the prostate
  • Scarring of the urethra
  • Infertility

What should I do if my results are positive or negative?

It is always recommended you meet with a healthcare provider to determine what your laboratory test results mean to you.

If your results were positive: You should share your results with your healthcare provider to discuss treatment options and/or further testing.

If your results were negative: A negative test result simply means the test did not detect the organism and doesn't necessarily indicate a clean bill of health. If you have symptoms or concerns over potential exposure, you should speak with your healthcare provider.

Chlamydia Testing

This test is looking for evidence of infection by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. Chlamydia is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the United States and can infect both men and women. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 2.8 million Americans are infected with chlamydia each year.

What are the symptoms of chlamydia?

About 75% of infected women and 50% of infected men have no symptoms of chlamydia, so routine screening is recommended for sexually active individuals. If symptoms do exist, they may present as one or more of the following in women:

  • Increased vaginal discharge
  • Vaginal bleeding between periods
Symptoms in men may include:
  • Penile discharge
  • Burning sensation during urination
  • Painful, swollen testicles

Is chlamydia curable?

Chlamydia can be cured when treated with a course of antibiotics.

What happens if I don't get treatment?

Untreated chlamydia can lead to the following in women:
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
  • Potential for tubal (ectopic) pregnancy
  • Infertility
  • Rectal itching
  • Red, swollen and itchy eyes
If left untreated in men, it can lead to:
  • Rectal itching
  • Red, swollen and itchy eyes
  • Infertility

What should I do if my results are positive or negative?

It is always recommended you meet with a healthcare provider to determine what your laboratory test results mean to you.

If your results were positive: You should share your results with your healthcare provider to discuss treatment options and/or further testing.

If your results were negative: A negative test result simply means the test did not detect the organism and doesn't necessarily indicate a clean bill of health. If you have symptoms or concerns over potential exposure, you should speak with your healthcare provider.

How do I get tested?

To order your own lab tests, you just need to follow these three easy steps:

  1. Complete a lab order form for your test online and print it out to take with you to the DLO Patient Service Center. Follow the instructions on the laboratory test order form if fasting is required for the testing you are ordering.
  2. Visit any DLO Patient Service Center throughout Oklahoma. Check in with our friendly staff and give them your completed order form. Full payment is due at time of service before sample collection is performed. Note that we accept all major credit cards and checks. Unfortunately, we cannot accept cash payments. Have one of our skilled phlebotomists draw a blood sample or take a urine sample, who will send your sample to our laboratory for testing.
  3. Create a MyQuest™ account and view your test results through the MyQuest online patient portal. Test results are available through MyQuest within 7-10 business days of completing your lab work.

What other resources are available to learn more about my health and laboratory tests?

DLO Direct™ offers direct access to laboratory testing for informational purposes only. A DLO Direct lab test result is not a medical diagnosis and is not intended as medical advice. Only a healthcare provider can interpret lab results and diagnose a medical condition or disease.

Because tests have not been ordered by a healthcare provider, third party entities, including Medicare and Medicaid, will not reimburse for these tests.