STD Panel

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The STD panel is a group of tests used to screen for common sexually transmitted diseases including herpes, syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia. These tests screen for the antibodies the body produces in response to the infection.

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1 and HSV-2) Screen

Herpes simplex virus testing is performed to detect herpes antibodies, an indication of a current or previous exposure to herpes. Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease caused by two types of viruses. The viruses are called herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2).

What is the difference between herpes simplex type 1 and herpes simplex type 2?

Both types are contagious and periodically cause small fever blisters (vesicles) that break to form open lesions. HSV-1 primarily causes blisters or “cold sores” around the mouth, while HSV-2 usually causes lesions around the genital area; however, either one can affect the oral or genital area.

What are symptoms of genital herpes?

Genital herpes sores usually appear as one or more blisters on or around the genitals, rectum or mouth. The blisters break and leave painful sores that may take weeks to heal. The first time someone has an outbreak of sores, they may also have flu-like symptoms such as fever, body aches or swollen glands.

Repeat outbreaks of genital herpes are common, especially during the first year after infection. Repeat outbreaks are usually shorter and less severe than the first outbreak. Although the infection can stay in the body for the rest of your life, the number of outbreaks tends to decrease over a period of years.

Is herpes curable?

There is no cure for herpes, but antiviral medications can prevent or shorten outbreaks.

How does the test work?

The blood test looks for appearance of antibodies to HSV, which are specific proteins the body creates and releases into the bloodstream in response to the infection. HSV IgM antibody production begins several days after a primary (initial) HSV infection and may be detectable in the blood for several weeks. HSV IgG antibody production begins after HSV IgM production. Once someone has been infected with HSV, they will continue to produce small quantities of HSV IgG. HSV antibody testing can detect both HSV-1 and HSV-2 viral types.

What should I do if my results are positive or negative?

It is always recommended you meet with a healthcare provider to determine what your laboratory test results mean to you.

If your results were positive: You should share your results with your healthcare provider to discuss treatment options and/or further testing. The presence of HSV-1 or HSV-2 IgM antibodies indicates an active or recent infection, while HSV-1 or HSV-2 IgG antibodies indicate a previous infection.

If your results were negative: A negative test result simply means the test did not detect the organism and doesn't necessarily indicate a clean bill of health. If you have symptoms or concerns over potential exposure, you should speak with your healthcare provider.

Syphilis Screen

Syphilis is an infection caused by the bacteria Treponema pallidum and is most often spread by sexual contact. Syphilis testing screens for the presence of antibodies the body produces in response to the bacteria.

How is the test performed?

An initial blood test is performed to look for antibodies the body produces as a result of the infection. If antibodies are found, a second test, called a reflex test, is performed to confirm the antibodies specifically target the syphilis bacteria to rule out the possibility of a false positive.

What are symptoms of syphilis?

Syphilis symptoms are divided into four stages; primary, secondary, latent and late syphilis.

Primary - During the primary stage, you may notice a single sore at the location where the syphilis entered your body. It is usually firm, round and painless and can easily go unnoticed. It lasts 3-6 weeks and heals whether you receive treatment or not, but you still need treatment or it will move into the secondary stage.

Secondary - In the secondary stage, you may have skin rashes and/or sores in your mouth, vagina (for women), or anus. This stage usually starts with a rash on one or more areas of your body and can look like rough, red or reddish-brown spots on the palms of your hands or bottoms of your feet. You may also experience fever, swollen lymph glands, sore throat, patchy hair loss, headaches, weight loss, muscle aches and fatibue. Like the primary stage, this symptoms will go away without treatment, but it will move into the latent stage without treatment.

Latent - The latent stage begins when symptoms disappear from the primary and secondary stages. Without treatment, you can continue to have syphilis in your body for years without any signs or symptoms.

Late syphilis - Most untreated people do not develop late syphilis, but it can be very serious and occurs 10-30 years after the infection began. Symptoms of late syphilis can include difficulty coordinating muscle movements, paralysis, numbness, blindness and dementia. Late stages of syphilis can damage organs and lead to death.

Is syphilis curable?

Syphilis can be cured when treated with a course of antibiotics.

What should I do if my results are positive or negative?

It is always recommended you meet with a healthcare provider to determine what your laboratory test results mean to you.

If your results were positive: Since the syphilis test requires a reflex test for confirmation, a positive result confirms you are infected with syphilis.

If your results were negative: Negative results mean it is unlikely an infection is present, but it may take several weeks after exposure to the bacteria for antibodies to appear. Your healthcare provider may request additional testing.

Gonorrhea/Chlamydia Screen

The gonorrhea/chlamydia test is to screen for or diagnose a gonorrhea and/or chlamydia infection. Testing for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonorrhea) is generally done simultaneously as the two organisms have similar clinical presentations. A definitive diagnosis is important since the symptoms of chlamydia can resemble those of gonorrhea and the two infections require different antibiotic treatment.

Gonorrhea Testing

The test is looking for presence of the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which causes the sexually transmitted disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that more than 700,000 people in the U.S. get new gonorrheal infections each year, but only half of these infections are reported to the CDC. Gonorrhea is generally transmitted through sexual contact (oral, vaginal, or anal) with an infected partner.

What are the symptoms of gonorrhea?

Many infected people do not exhibit symptoms of gonorrhea, so routine screening is recommended for sexually active individuals. If symptoms do exist, they may present as one or more of the following:

  • Pain during urination
  • Pain during bowel movements
  • Anal discharge
  • Itching
  • Soreness
  • Bleeding
  • A newborn with conjunctivitis

Women may also experience

  • Increased vaginal discharge
  • Vaginal bleeding between periods

Men may also experience

  • Penile discharge
  • Painful, swollen testicles

Is gonorrhea curable?

Gonorrhea can be cured when treated with a course of antibiotics.

What happens if I don't get treatment?

Untreated gonorrhea can lead to the following in women:
  • Chronic menstrual difficulties
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
  • Miscarriage
  • Inflammation of the bladder
  • Inflammation of the lining of the uterus after childbirth
If left untreated in men, it can lead to:
  • Inflammation of the prostate
  • Scarring of the urethra
  • Infertility

What should I do if my results are positive or negative?

It is always recommended you meet with a healthcare provider to determine what your laboratory test results mean to you.

If your results were positive: You should share your results with your healthcare provider to discuss treatment options and/or further testing.

If your results were negative: A negative test result simply means the test did not detect the organism and doesn't necessarily indicate a clean bill of health. If you have symptoms or concerns over potential exposure, you should speak with your healthcare provider.

Chlamydia Testing

This test is looking for evidence of infection by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. Chlamydia is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the United States and can infect both men and women. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 2.8 million Americans are infected with chlamydia each year.

What are the symptoms of chlamydia?

About 75% of infected women and 50% of infected men have no symptoms of chlamydia, so routine screening is recommended for sexually active individuals. If symptoms do exist, they may present as one or more of the following in women:

  • Increased vaginal discharge
  • Vaginal bleeding between periods
Symptoms in men may include:
  • Penile discharge
  • Burning sensation during urination
  • Painful, swollen testicles

Is chlamydia curable?

Chlamydia can be cured when treated with a course of antibiotics.

What happens if I don't get treatment?

Untreated chlamydia can lead to the following in women:
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
  • Potential for tubal (ectopic) pregnancy
  • Infertility
  • Rectal itching
  • Red, swollen and itchy eyes
If left untreated in men, it can lead to:
  • Rectal itching
  • Red, swollen and itchy eyes
  • Infertility

What should I do if my results are positive or negative?

It is always recommended you meet with a healthcare provider to determine what your laboratory test results mean to you.

If your results were positive: You should share your results with your healthcare provider to discuss treatment options and/or further testing.

If your results were negative: A negative test result simply means the test did not detect the organism and doesn't necessarily indicate a clean bill of health. If you have symptoms or concerns over potential exposure, you should speak with your healthcare provider.

How do I get tested?

To order your own lab tests, you just need to follow these three easy steps:

  1. Complete a lab order form for your test online and print it out to take with you to the DLO Patient Service Center. Follow the instructions on the laboratory test order form if fasting is required for the testing you are ordering.
  2. Visit any DLO Patient Service Center throughout Oklahoma. Check in with our friendly staff and give them your completed order form. Full payment is due at time of service before sample collection is performed. Note that we accept all major credit cards and checks. Unfortunately, we cannot accept cash payments. Have one of our skilled phlebotomists draw a blood sample or take a urine sample, who will send your sample to our laboratory for testing.
  3. Create a MyQuest™ account and view your test results through the MyQuest online patient portal. Test results are available through MyQuest within 7-10 business days of completing your lab work.

What other resources are available to learn more about my health and laboratory tests?

DLO Direct™ offers direct access to laboratory testing for informational purposes only. A DLO Direct lab test result is not a medical diagnosis and is not intended as medical advice. Only a healthcare provider can interpret lab results and diagnose a medical condition or disease.

Because tests have not been ordered by a healthcare provider, third party entities, including Medicare and Medicaid, will not reimburse for these tests.